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Baltimore Star Spangled 200

By: Craig Shipp

Baltimore Star Spangled 200 - 200th anniversary of Francis Scott Key writing the poem that later became
the United States of America's National Anthem, "The Star Spangled Banner" (see history below).  

The video below was shot in Ultra High Definition 4k with the Panasonic Lumix FZ1000

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"The Star-Spangled Banner" is the national anthem of the United States. The lyrics come from "Defence of Fort M'Henry",[1] a poem written in 1814 by the 35-year-old lawyer and amateur poet Francis Scott Key after witnessing the bombardment of Fort McHenry by British ships of the Royal Navy in the Chesapeake Bayduring the Battle of Fort McHenry in the War of 1812.

The poem was set to the tune of a popular British song written by John Stafford Smith for the Anacreontic Society, a men's social club in London. "The Anacreontic Song" (or "To Anacreon in Heaven"), with various lyrics, was already popular in the United States. Set to Key's poem and renamed "The Star-Spangled Banner", it would soon become a well-known American patriotic song. With a range of one octave and one fifth (a semitone more than an octave and a half), it is known for being difficult to sing. Although the poem has four stanzas, only the first is commonly sung today. "The Star-Spangled Banner" was recognized for official use by the Navy in 1889, and by President Woodrow Wilson in 1916, and was made the national anthem by a congressional resolution on March 3, 1931 (46 Stat. 1508, codified at 36 U.S.C.), which was signed by President Herbert HooverBefore 1931, other songs served as the hymns of American officialdom. "Hail, Columbia" served this purpose at official functions for most of the 19th century. "My Country, 'Tis of Thee", whose melody is identical to "God Save the Queen", the British national anthem,[2] also served as a de facto anthem.[3] Following the War of 1812 and subsequent American wars, other songs emerged to compete for popularity at public events, among them "The Star-Spangled Banner".


The National Anthem consists of four verses. On almost every occasion only the first verse is sung.

Oh, say can you see by the dawn's early light
What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming?
Whose broad stripes and bright stars thru the perilous fight,
O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming?
And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there.
Oh, say does that star-spangled banner yet wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep,
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep,
As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
In full glory reflected now shines in the stream:
'Tis the star-spangled banner! Oh long may it wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion,
A home and a country should leave us no more!
Their blood has washed out of of their foul footsteps' pollution.
No refuge could save the hireling and slave'
From the terror of flight and the gloom of the grave:
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

Oh! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand
Between their loved home and the war's desolation!
Blest with victory and peace, may the heav'n rescued land
Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation.
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
And this be our motto: "In God is our trust."
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

For event info also see

About the photographer: Craig Shipp - - is a New Media pioneer to learn more follow him on twitter at or friend him on facebook at (friending will allow you to tag the photos with names so your friends can find them) - you can also check out his flickr photos at

Photos can be downloaded FREE of charge from flickr in various sizes (free account required). To do so visit the following link:

Then click on the collection and then the set to find the photo. There are also links from my articles direct to featured photos.

After you've opened the set click on the photo you want. Then click on the download arrow in the bottom right to pull up the menu. Then you will see a "View all sizes" link. (you may need to be logged into flickr to have these options - accounts are FREE)

The View all sizes link brings you to a page where you can click on various size links from Square (75 x 75) all the way up to Original. Click on the size you want and then click on the link to download that size and save to your desktop or your pictures folder.

If the picture you want is needed in a high-quality .tiff un-compressed format e-mail me and I can make it available to you at no cost for personal use. 

PS: Many of my videos can be downloaded from vimeo (Free account required)

"Events define our life - if not captured, preserved and shared in photos did they ever happen?" Craig Shipp

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Baltimore Star Spangled 200

By: Craig Shipp
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